Photo-monitoring

We have been creating 360 degree images at nine monitoring sites since 2009. Images are stitched from about 8 separate images taken using a tripod that is carefully leveled. Photo-points provide a broad record of change over time and enable us to monitor the overall health of the ecosystem. Photo-points also clearly show burning and slashing. 

In 2009 we were still learning the best method, the first lesson is to use cloudy rather than sunny conditions to avoid shadows. We also realised that we need two images, one of the ground and another for the trees. Our images are taken from photo-point 1.

Disturbance map 2015

 

In 2012, we burnt the wetland around photo-point 1, although by September the ground is starting to green up. The photo-point image consists of two horizontal landscapes that are overlaid, although the registration of the images is not perfect. The apparent tracks are fire control lines.

Disturbance map 2015
Disturbance map 2012

By 2015, the effects of the burn are not at all apparent, and the juvenile gum tree in the middle of the image has re-sprouted. At the resolution of the images on the web page, it is difficult to see any changes in tree health, whereas this can be one of the more useful aspects of photo-point images.

Disturbance map 2015
Disturbance map 2015

Photo-points are widely separated, and mostly centred in open sites. One photo-point is on the roof of our house, which gives an elevated perspective.

Disturbance map 2015
Locations of photo-points at Rubicon. Map data: Google